Blog Archives

Back in the Stacks: 1992

Since it feels like summer was decades ago, we took a look at summer decades ago; a sampling of our periodicals. It was hot. Once upon a time.

1992_4

Open the The New Yorker, what’s the first thing you see? The New Yorker, June 1992.

1992_17

Rappers in recovery. Alan Light, “L.A. Rappers Speak Out.” Rolling Stone, June 25, 1992.

1992_2

Still maybe an issue. Mad, June 1992.

1992_21

Walter De Maria and El Greco in Stockholm’s Moderna Museet, from “All Fives, Sevens, and Nines,” by Lars Nittve. Artforum, Summer 1992.

1992_1

Mad, June 1992.

1992_22

Danny Tisdale, Lynching 1930. From “Engendered Species,” by Kobena Mercer. Artforum, Summer 1992

1992_23

“On the Road to Kassel,” Artforum, Summer 1992.

1992_18

The hits. Rolling Stone, June 25, 1992.

1992_3

Novum, June 1992.

1992_11

More car ads featuring cops. Vanity Fair, June 1992.

1992_19

Before mixology. Rolling Stone, June 25, 1992.

1992_16

From an interview with George Condo, by Anney Bonney. Bomb, Summer 1992.

1992_12

Vogue, June 1992.

1992_14

Be thankful for lasers. Vogue, June 1992.

1992_9

Checking up on the crooks. Annie Leibovitz, “Watergate.” Vanity Fair, June 1992.

1992_15

Before Bill did it. Julia Reed, “Clinton on the Brink.” Vogue, June 1992.

1992_6

“Documenting Documenta.” Interview, June 1992.

1992_13

Fashion fish. Vogue, June 1992.

1992_7

It doesn’t stop. Interview, June 1992.

1992_8

And no one is pretending. Interview, June 1992.

1992_10

Religion. Vanity Fair, June 1992.

1992_5

From John Ashbery’s “Baked Alaska.” The New Yorker, June 29, 1992.

Advertisements

FiberArts

FiberArts  features contemporary artists who work with fabric, weaving, sewing, dyes, textiles, embroidery, crochet, knitting, needlework and soft sculpture in order to produce works that boast both fine craftsmanship and fine art. Although expression and decoration with textiles is ancient, it was only fairly recently accepted in the fine arts world. The fibers revolution of the 1960’s led to a huge number of artists, both men and women, exploring and experimenting in a medium which was once labeled “women’s work” or pushed aside from the arts scene as mere craft.

FiberArts Spines

In the library you will find 122 Issues of FiberArts  from 1979 to the Summer 2011 issue, which was sadly the last.

FiberArts. March/April 1989.
“Dinner” by Joan Ward Summer. 1985. Wool, tapestry.

FiberArts. January/February 1982.
“Rhythm” by Jarmila Machova.

FiberArts. Summer 1990.
“The Street Story Quilt Part 1: The Accident” by Faith Ringgold. 1985.

FiberArts. March/April 1989.
Masking Costume of the Igbo People, Nigeria.

FiberArts. Summer 1990.
“Animated Power” (1987) and “The Harvest” (1989) by Tina Brewer.

FiberArts. November/December 1988.
Left: “Hanging Gardens of Babylon” by Anna Arbor. 1987. Saftey fence & Surveyor’s ribbon, woven and knotted.
Right: “The Neighborhood Nuisances” by Beth Holyoke. 1987. Ripstop Nylon & Applique.

FiberArts. November/December 1989.
Lillian Elliot

FiberArts. November/December 1989.
(An advertisement.)

FiberArts. November/December 1989.
Top: “Leopards” by Jean Hewes. 1988.
Bottom: “Edmond’s Fast Food” by Chris Wolf. 1989.

FiberArts. January/February 1982.

FiberArts. 1980, No 6.
Katherine Westphal.

FiberArts. March/April 1982.

Left Page: “Rose of Fire” and “Movement of Red” by Akiko Kotani.
Right Page: Carol Mecagni

FiberArts. 1979.
Pam Patrie.

FiberArts. 1980, No 6.
Judith Poxson Fawkes.

FiberArts. 1981, No 2.
Anne McKenzie Nicholson.

FiberArts. March/April 1982.
Machine-Knit garments by Betsy Lahaussios, Mickey Nushawg, Susanna Lewis, Jean Williams Cacicedo.

FiberArts. March/April 1982.
Left: detail of “Four in One” by Carole Beadle.
Right: detail of work by Lia Cook.

FiberArts. March/April 1982.
Large picture: “Gingko Grid” by Diane Itter.

FiberArts. Summer 1990.

FiberArts. Summer 1990.

FiberArts. 1980, No 6.

FiberArts. November/December 1982.

FiberArts. November/December 1982.

FiberArts. January/February 1983.
Top Left: Man’s Robe. Turkestan.
Top Right: “Charles Patless” by Pat Oleszko.
Bottom: “Stop and Go Dress” by Cynthia Pannucci.

FiberArts. January/February 1983.

FiberArts. January/February 1983.
Left to Right, Clockwise (Artists, not pictured): Jocelyn Turner, Judith Content, Judith Stein, Norma Rosen.

FiberArts. January/February 1983.
Clockwise from bottom left (artists, not pictured): Cate Fitt, Fraas/Slade, Yvonne Porcella, Ellen Haputli, Dina Knapp.

Nance O'Banion

Nance O’Banion

Harmony Hammond

Harmony Hammond

FiberArts. 1980, No 6.

Bonnie Meltzer with two of her crocheted yarn hangings, "Middle Aged Date" and "Man Eating Spaghetti"

Bonnie Meltzer with two of her crocheted yarn hangings, “Middle Aged Date” and “Man Eating Spaghetti”

Betye Saar

Betye Saar

FiberArts, Volume 1. 1980.

FiberArts. 1981, No 2.
“Moma and Nana” by Faith Ringgold.

Plaid Shirt by Deborah Kaufman, Felted Wool, 26 x 36 "

FiberArts, Volume 1. 1980.
Plaid Shirt by Deborah Kaufman, Felted Wool, 26 x 36 “

American Fabrics and Fashion

American Fabrics and Fashion (also called American Fabrics) was a commercial textile magazine created as a guide for manufacturers in the fabrics industry. In every issue there are dozens of physical fabric samples glued in, so in case you were wondering, “What did the 50’s feel like?”, here is the most literal answer to your question. Accompanying the samples are textile advertisements and sometimes the samples are even incorporated into the ads themselves. For anyone interested in fashion, textiles or all that is tactile, American Fabrics is a publication of great cultural and historical value.

BookScanCenter

We have 105 Issues of American Fabrics, 1946-1975.

American Fabrics, Number 72. 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 72. 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 69. Fall 1965.

American Fabrics, Number 69. Fall 1965.
Cover Art by W Lully.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.
Cover Art by W Lully.

issue85winter 69-70

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.
Cover Art by W Lully.

72-summer66

American Fabrics, Number 72. Summer 1966.
Cover Art by W Lully.

American Fabrics, Number 2. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 2. 1947.

issue88fall70x

American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

 

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 103. Spring 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 103. Spring 1975.

\

American Fabrics, Number 50. Summer 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 50. Summer 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 49. Spring 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 49. Spring 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 52. Spring 1961.

American Fabrics, Number 52. Spring 1961.
(Not a picture of Supima seeds but a real packet of seeds!)

American Fabrics, Number 31. Winter 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 31. Winter 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 105. Fall 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 105. Fall 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 102.1974.

American Fabrics, Number 102.1974.

American Fabrics, Number 69.1965.

American Fabrics, Number 69. 1965.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 86. Spring 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 86. Spring 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 87. Summer 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 87. Summer 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 104. Winter 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 104. Winter 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 02. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 02. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, 1980.

American Fabrics, 1980.