Blog Archives

Advertising – Cigarettes

Instead of a cigarette, enjoy a small sampling from our chronological assortment of 1000’s cigarette ads, from the 1920’s till today, currently on display on the top shelf of the picture collection.

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1920-1929

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1930-1939

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1940-1949

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1950-1959

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1960-1969

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1970-1979

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1980-1989

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1990-1999

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2000-2009

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2010-2019

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Scanlan’s Monthly

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Scanlan’s Monthly
Volume One Number One (March 1970)

The tiny American flag and big six-figure check on the first-issue cover proclaim their audacity. No kneeling to sacred cows, least of all advertising.

Warren Hinckle came from Ramparts, which published Che Guevara, Fidel Castro and Eldridge Cleaver. Sidney Zion wrote for most of the New York publications you’ve heard of, and was the one who revealed the name of the guy who leaked the Pentagon Papers.

Together their monthly ran eight issues.

The first, in our rare periodicals archive, pretends ads don’t exist, favors the extended narrative, and pushes against journalistic hypocrisy. There’s a report offering Altamont as a refutation of Woodstock, an assertion of the normalcy of atrocity in Vietnam, a tale of CBS-CIA collusion in Haiti, the American- and British-made disaster of Biafra, Mark Twain’s radicality, high school activist thought, mobster biography, and a ski champ-turned-salesman profile by Hunter S. Thompson, whose gonzo paradigm, “The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved,” debuted in Scanlan’s third issue. Their last was boycotted by U.S. printers for covering domestic guerilla warfare.

“We will make no high-blown promises about how great this magazine is going to be,” Hinckle and Zion wrote on the cover. “Pay the buck and turn the page.”

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Hunter S. Thompson, “The Temptations of Jean-Claude Killy”

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Sol Stern, “Altamont: The Woodstock Nation’s Pearl Harbor”

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Richard Severo, “The Lost Tribe of Alabama”

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Ben Hecht, “The Unfinished Life of Mickey Cohen”

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James D. Henry, “The Men of “B” Company”

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Mark Libarle, “Another Generation Gap”

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Joseph Kahn, “Dirty Kitchens of New York”

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Maxwell Geismar, “Mark Twain and the Robber Barons”

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Soviet Life

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Soviet Life
May 1968-May 1981 (incomplete)

In 1956 the U.S. and Soviet governments agreed to a mutual propaganda plan modeled on Life. From them we got The USSR which became Soviet Life which became Russian Life. From us they got Amerika which became America Illustrated. “Soft” propaganda for a Cold War. Gentle cultural competition. Achievement, progress, beauty, tourism. Soviet Life could celebrate the cosmonauts and the construction of a dam as though ballistics and explosives were signs of society’s liberation. One can just imagine what Amerika looked like.

Somewhat relatedly, the U.S. Information Agency, which seems to have had a hand in all this, also employed Chermayeff & Geismar (which later added & Haviv) for a traveling Russian-language exhibition that showcased American design. Featured among the designer portraits, which can be found in the Milton Glaser Archives, was none other than Milton Glaser.

Find Soviet Life bound in green in the back near the bathrooms.

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Intercosmos: Orbits of Cooperation, April 1981

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Perhaps the Hardest Part is Waiting, April 1981

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Kutaisi, This Wonderful Town, May 1981

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The Festival for Everybody, May 1981

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Marx and Lincoln, May 1968

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Women Take Over Men’s Jobs, May 1981

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What is Kreshchatik to the Man on the Street?, July 1968

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Blast Saves a City, June 1968

American Fabrics and Fashion

American Fabrics and Fashion (also called American Fabrics) was a commercial textile magazine created as a guide for manufacturers in the fabrics industry. In every issue there are dozens of physical fabric samples glued in, so in case you were wondering, “What did the 50’s feel like?”, here is the most literal answer to your question. Accompanying the samples are textile advertisements and sometimes the samples are even incorporated into the ads themselves. For anyone interested in fashion, textiles or all that is tactile, American Fabrics is a publication of great cultural and historical value.

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We have 105 Issues of American Fabrics, 1946-1975.

American Fabrics, Number 72. 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 72. 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 69. Fall 1965.

American Fabrics, Number 69. Fall 1965.
Cover Art by W Lully.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.
Cover Art by W Lully.

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American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.
Cover Art by W Lully.

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American Fabrics, Number 72. Summer 1966.
Cover Art by W Lully.

American Fabrics, Number 2. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 2. 1947.

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American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

 

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 85. Winter 1969.

American Fabrics, Number 103. Spring 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 103. Spring 1975.

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American Fabrics, Number 50. Summer 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 50. Summer 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 49. Spring 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 49. Spring 1960.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 52. Spring 1961.

American Fabrics, Number 52. Spring 1961.
(Not a picture of Supima seeds but a real packet of seeds!)

American Fabrics, Number 31. Winter 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 31. Winter 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 105. Fall 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 105. Fall 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 88. Fall 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 01.1946.

American Fabrics, Number 102.1974.

American Fabrics, Number 102.1974.

American Fabrics, Number 69.1965.

American Fabrics, Number 69. 1965.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 30. Fall 1954.

American Fabrics, Number 86. Spring 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 86. Spring 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 87. Summer 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 87. Summer 1970.

American Fabrics, Number 104. Winter 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 104. Winter 1975.

American Fabrics, Number 02. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 02. 1947.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, Number 71. Spring/Summer 1966.

American Fabrics, 1980.

American Fabrics, 1980.

Toys – Dolls

Toys has 9 subcategories, 8 of which are chronological distinctions (pre-1950, and then by decade through the partially futuristic 2010-2019) and one of which is Dolls. Toys – Dolls contains 126 items. Here are just a few:

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Kewpie Dolls, first manufactured in 1912.
All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo: Angelo Hornak

All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo: Angelo Hornak

1855 & 1875 Wax Dolls

1855 & 1875 Wax Dolls
All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo: Angelo Hornak

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All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo: Angelo Hornak

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All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo: Angelo Hornak

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November 1943

December 1967

A doll with a doll:

All Color Book of Dolls, 1974 by Kay Desmonde.
Photo by Angelo Hornak.

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November 1955

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December 15, 1997.
Photo by Richard Mitchell.

The doll that encourages bullying: (“It’s easy to make her cry.”)

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The dolls that are gluttons for punishment:

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1990