Blog Archives

Advertising – Paper & Printing

Currently at a modest 50 items, Advertising – Paper & Printing deserves to be cultivated more (and the depths of my hermit-packed, cave like office could certainly provide the materials). Illustration Westvaco (1927-1954), which has been around far longer than this infantile subject, are essentially printing advertisements in booklet form. These are single-page ads culled from publications such as Communication Arts, Fortune Magazine, and Graphis, ranging from the late 1940’s to the early 1980’s.

We have a number of chivalrous Champion Paper ads, some of which are variations on the  below but with a different background saturation color.

Fortune Magazine, August 1949. Champion Papers.

Fortune Magazine, August 1949. Champion Papers.

The Automation of the Gaze:

Fortune Magazine, July 1949. UPLS (The United States Printing and Lithograph Company).

Fortune Magazine, July 1949. UPLS (The United States Printing and Lithograph Company).

If it is an ad placed in a late 1940’s or early 1950’s Fortune Magazine, there is a one in three chance that a hand will feature prominently.

Fortune Magazine, September 1949. Levelcoat Printing Papers by the Kimberly-Clark Corporation.

Fortune Magazine, September 1949. Levelcoat Printing Papers by the Kimberly-Clark Corporation.

Consolidated boasts about landing the coveted American Airlines Account.

Fortune Magazine, March 1950. Consolidated Enamel Papers.

Fortune Magazine, March 1950. Consolidated Enamel Papers.


Prepared in the public interest by Beloit Iron Works.

Fortune, July 1951. Beloit Iron Works.

Fortune, July 1951. Beloit Iron Works.

Fortune Magazine, July 1951. Beloit Iron Works.

Fortune Magazine, July 1951. Beloit Iron Works.

Graphis, v. 9, n. 49 (1953)

Graphis, v. 9, n. 49 (1953)

Communication Arts, v. 13, n. 1 (1971). Kimberly-Clark.

Communication Arts, v. 13, n. 1 (1971). Kimberly-Clark.

Seymour Chwast illustrated this, equal parts regal and far-out, irrational fear of mushrooms.

Communication Arts, v. 13, n. 1 (1971). Strathmore.

Communication Arts, v. 13, n. 1 (1971). Strathmore.

And finally…

Geo, December 1980. Champion. Painting By David Wilcox.

Geo, December 1980. Champion. Painting By David Wilcox.

Magazine Covers 1960-1969

We continue our look at magazine covers throughout the decades with a diverse smattering from the 1960’s. We start off with some teen magazines (teen magazines, much like the teenagers, were invented in the 1950’s and really came into their own in the 1960’s).

Teen (November 1964)

19 (August 1969)

We have many nice film magazine from the 1950’s forward, here are a few:

Film Culture (Summer 1960)

Film Quarterly (Winter 1967-8) Still from Aurthur Penn's "Bonnie and Clyde"

The French sure love their cinema. 

An early edition of L’Esprit Créateur: The International Quarterly of French and Francophone Studies.

L'Esprit Createur (Winter 1968)

A couple titanic Fortune Magazines (of which we have many from the 1940’s on).

Fortune (August 1969)

Fortune (June 1964)

A couple of our Graphic Design and Art covers:

Graphis n. 113 (1964)

Art International (1965) Photograph of Yaacov Agam's mural, Double Metamorphosis, on the S.S. Shalom, flagship of the Zim Lines.

Art International (March 1964) Cover by: Rollin Crampton

Industrial Design (November 1969)

Realites (1967)

A trio of the ever elegant Met Bulletin Covers:

Met Bulletin (February 1968)

Met Bulletin (October 1968) A North African Hanging from about 1600, woven silk with metal thread, 18 feet 8 inches x 4 feet 4 inches.

Met Bulletin (February 1969) Water Color by Jacob Marrel.

Met Bulletin (October 1969) Front (aka: right) The Thorn of Charity. Back: David with Two Musicians, and David and Goliath. Miniatures, enlarged three and a half time (per the original cover), from a psalter and prayer book made for Bonne of Luxembourg by Jean Pucelle, French. About 1345. Colors on parchment, 2 1/8 inches x 1 7/8 inches and 2 1/16 inches x 1 3/4 inches. The Cloisters Collection.

And an exceedingly shiny Harper’s Bazaar cover:

Harper's Bazar (December 1969)

Movie: “Reasoned Disagreement About Films in Britian”

Sometimes understatement and subtlety can backfire, especially when it is used for something as permanently identifying as a periodical’s title. Apparently referring to the word ‘film,’  V.F. Perkins wrote in a tribute to Ian Cameron (Cameron was the founder, designer and editor of Movie and Perkins an associate editor) that “the vulgar Americanism of the word gave it shock value and a pronounced identity.” Maybe that was true in 1960’s Oxford, England, but these days it’s just a really generic name that easily gets lost in our vast information shuffle. But it shouldn’t. Movie is a wonderful film magazine that took its cue and influence from the French Cahiers du cinéma.

Left: Back cover of issue 2, Blake Edward’s EXPERIMENT IN TERROR. Right: Front cover if issue 3, Emmanuele Riva in THERESE DESQUEYROUX

For Movie, criticism stems from, and is the logical conclusion of, the fanaticism that the writers and editors share for film. They write about movies and directors that they are really passionate about. They have a pluralistic philosophy when it comes to criticism. Much of the motivation for starting the magazine was the disenchantment they felt for established film criticism, which they felt tried to insinuate that there is one official stance when it comes to films and filmmakers. In the opening editorial of issue #1 (June 1962) they proclaimed “there is no point in replacing one cult with another. Instead we would like films to be the subject of enthusiastic argument in which our approach would only be one of many.” Despite all this, Movie had some very specific ideas about what is good and what is less so, as demonstrated in this histogram (also from issue #1):

As you can see it’s a list of directors, not writers, actors, producers,  or cinematographers. Movie was interested (in the least) with the Auteur Theory of film criticism.  First written about in a 1954 article by Francois Truffaut in Cahiers du cinéma, the Auteur Theory asserts that the director is (or should be) considered the author of a film. There is a nice little history of the theory by Donald E. Staples in Cinema Journal, Vol. 6, (1966 – 1967), pp. 1-7 (which you can access through JSTOR).

 

 

Left: The four stars of “Jumbo” Right: Mylene Demongeot in Michel Deville’s “A cause, a cause d’une femme”

 

You can find Movie in our back periodical stacks (dial M for Movie). Over it’s history the publication frequency was erratic, punctuated by frequent hiatuses, but they persisted for 29 years. We have 28 years: no.1(1962:June)-no.34/35(1990:Winter) (I believe they ceased publication with no.36 in 1991).  If you take some time to read the densely packed, but artfully designed issues, you will find in-depth interviews with a vast array of filmmakers, and gobs of writing on closely analyzed moving images captured on celluloid.  Ian Cameron was a well respected film critic, who apart from having this lovely mag as his periodic child, also wrote many books on film and helped England catch up with the (at the time) more cutting edge France and even the USA. It is a rich addition to our periodical collection. I’ll leave you with a couple more images from the magazine:

Right: Nagisa Oshim’s “The Hanging” Left: Sterling Hayden in Ruy Guerra’s “Sweet Hunters”