Category Archives: Periodicals

Features new subscriptions, recent acquisitions, dead runs of interest, and generally highlights the Visual Arts Library Periodicals Collection.

High Performance

High Performance Spines

High Performance was published by Art in the Public Interest from 1978 to 1997:

Originally a magazine covering performance art, over time it gradually shifted its editorial focus from art that was formally adventurous to art that was socially and culturally adventurous. Back issues of the magazine can still be seen at better libraries around the world. The High Performance archive is in the collection of the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles (Art in the Public Interest  website, accessed 12/18/2013).

In the SVA library, by definition, one of the better, you’ll find all but a few issues of High Performance, 64 in total, from the 2nd issue (1978) to the 76th and final issue (1997).

Accessible in print at the SVA Library and electronically for SVA students via Art Source (MySVA username and password required), Jenni Sorkin’s article in Art Journal, “Envisioning High Performance chronicles High Performance’s history and lasting influence, and provides this description of the magazine’s format for the first five years of its existence:  

With the commencement of High Performance, publisher, founder, and editor Linda Frye Burnham invented a standard format for the documentation and dissemination of live and ephemeral artworks, creating single- or double-paged spreads that paired a photograph with an artist-supplied text chronicling the live event. Operating on an open submission policy from its founding in 1978 until 1982, Burnham published any artist who could provide black-and-white photographic documentation, dates, and a description of the performance (Sorkin).

It was important in terms of documentation, ensuring that these performance art pieces, which often only occurred once, could have a life beyond the memories of a small audience that happened to witness them. It also helped define and lend credence to a genre of art that was not receiving serious critical attention, not least of all because the lack of documentation. High Performance helped define performance art both by what it published and also with what it didn’t. By “rejecting outright the inclusion of dance, theater, and music, HP delineated clear boundaries by determining what was not performance art” (Sorkin). Among many other,  artists featured include Carolee Schneeman, Pat Oleszko, The Waitresses,  Paul McCarthy, Kim Jones, Linda Montano, and Barbara T. Smith.

Please enjoy the following sample from the pages of:

High Performance, no 20. 1983.

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High Performance, no 21. 1983.

Anne Bean's "The Fall of Babylon".

High Performance, no 25. 1984. Back Cover.
Anne Bean’s “The Fall of Babylon”. Photos by Chris Bishop.

Johanna Went. Photo by Anna Barrado

Johanna Went. Photo by Anna Barrado
High Performance, no 28. 1984.

"Orbit on the Hour" by Yura Adams.

“Orbit on the Hour” by Yura Adams. Photo by Kim McLean.
High Performance, no 22. 1983.

"Dermoid" by Nancy Forest Brown.

“Dermoid” by Nancy Forest Brown.
High Performance, no 14. Summer 1981.

Carolee Schneemann

Carolee Schneemann. Photo by James Tenney.
High Performance, no 20. 1983.

Wendy O

Wendy O of the Plasmatics
High Performance, no 21. 1983.

Sheree Levin and Bob Flanagan

Sheree Levin and Bob Flanagan’s Improvisation with Food and Poetry. Photo by Bones.
High Performance, no 16. Winter 1981-2.

"Disturbed Water" by Louise Udaykee

“Disturbed Water” by Louise Udaykee. Photo by Gregory X.
High Performance, no 08. Winter 1979-1980.

"Rolling Drawing" by Nigel Rolfe

“Rolling Drawing” by Nigel Rolfe.
High Performance, no 14. Summer 1981.

Protest Performance

Performance protesting discrimination against women and minority artists in museums.
High Performance, no 15. Fall 1981.

The Waitresses(?)

The Waitresses(?)
High Performance, no 16. Winter 1981-2.

High Performance

High Performance, no 14. Summer 1981.

"In the Garden" by Anne Mavor and Marianne Bonetti

“In the Garden” by Anne Mavor and Marianne Bonetti. Photo by Elizabeth Canelake.
High Performance, no 09. Spring 1980.

Bea Licata

Bea Licata. Photo by Karen Lightner.
High Performance, no 09. Spring 1980.

Sandra Binion, Jurgen Klauke

Left: Sandra Binion. Photo by Dustin Pittman.
Right: Jurgen Klauke. Photo by Betzel Verlag.
High Performance, no 09. Spring 1980.

High Performance

High Performance, no 02. June 1978. Back Cover.

Paul McCarthy

Left: Coco Gordon. Photo by Helmet Becker.
Right: Paul McCarthy. Photo by the Dark Bob
High Performance, no 09. Spring 1980.

High Performance, no 04. December 1978.

Likay performance in Thailand

High Performance, no 52. Winter 1990. Back Cover.
The Boonlert Sit Homhuan Theater of Bangkok performing Likay, the traditional popular theater of Thailand, during the Los Angeles Festival.
Photo by Dr. Thomas F. Reese.

Rain Spirit and Trash Monster in "Rites of Spring" Procession

High Performance, no 67. Fall 1994. Back Cover.
Rain Spirit and Trash Monster in “Rites of Spring” Procession.
Photo by Shanna Dressler.

High Performance, no 04. December 1978.z

 

Works Cited

 Sorkin, Jenni. “Envisioning High Performance.” Art Journal 62.2 (2003): 36-51. Art Source. Web. 5 Dec. 2013.

Lucky Peach

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Lucky Peach is the product of superstar chef David Chang (Momofuku), the writer Peter Meehan, and editor Chris Ying (Anthony Bourdain is also listed as a contributor). This whimsically illustrated and humorously annotated  magazine should be a staple for food enthusiasts. Each issue has a running food-related theme featuring recipes, interviews, reviews and the occasional science lesson (the microbiology of miso? my guts feel better already). The artwork is not to go understated though- the graphic design, photography and especially the illustration really push this journal over the top.

Lucky Peach is published by McSweeney’s (the people that bring you The Believer and the namesake Timothy McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern), which has been evident in the first 8 issues with the quality and mood of the illustration. But with this 9th edition, the McSweeney’s stamp also shows up in the innovative printing design. This issue came with a supplement called Guts that you had to perform an operation to remove:

In Stitches

unstitched half way out

 

Guts Front Cover

The outside of the pouch and front cover is by Celeste Byres.

Inside Guts:

Pictured below is Dario Cecchini “vivisecting a pig while reciting Dante” (from the editors note by Chris Ying).

inside guts

Illustration below by Kelsey Short.

inside guts 2 (illustration)

On the back cover of issue n. 9 of Lucky Peach  is Domenico DeMarco of Di Fara Pizza in Midwood, Brooklyn (a pizzeria in my personal top 2) (photo by Gabriele Stabile) from an article called “The Specialists” about individuals that do one thing perfectly.

9 (back cover, Di Fara Pizza, Domenico DeMarco)

Our collection begins with n. 2. Below are a few highlights from the back issue. Dig in.

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Issue number 2 (above) is all about “The Sweet Spot”- Striving for culinary perfection and efficiency.

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Number 3 is “The Cooks and Chefs” issue. It explores the ‘celebrity chef’, the stay-at-home chef and all other walks of food-cooking-folk.

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Issue 3, illustrated by Tony Millionaire

Know what your eating on a microscopic level.

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Issue 3

A brief history of cake.

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Issue 2, drawings by Celeste Byers

Some bonus illustrations of things you don’t want to find in the back of your fridge.

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Issue 2

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issue 2, illustrated by Jing Wei

Miso hungry.

Strapazin

First launched in 1984, Strapazin is a Swiss-based, German language comics magazine focused on the underground and independent scenes. The aesthetic of the work selected is often defined by expressive, gestural drawings filled with motion and  energy. Notable Strapazin contributors include SVA’s own Gary Panter and David Sandlin, as well as  Daniel Johnston, Le Dernier Cri and Julie Doucet.


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The SVA library has 25 issues of Strapazin from June 1994 through the current issue.

Strapazin, No. 106. March 2012.

Strapazin, No. 106. March 2012.
Cover by Sharmila Banerjee

Strapazin, No. 76.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 76.

Strapazin, No. 76.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 76.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

David Sandlin
Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

David Sandlin
Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

Strapazin, No. 39. June 1995.

Strapazin, No. 39. June 1995.

Strapazin, No. 103. June 2011.

Helge Reumann & Xavier Robel
Strapazin, No. 103. June 2011.

 

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Le Dernier Cri
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Le Dernier Cri
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Hans Scharer

Hans Scharer
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

 

Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Douect
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

 

Photo by Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.
Photo by Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

 

Strapazin, No. 107. June 2012.

Patrick Savolainen
Strapazin, No. 107. June 2012.

Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Xiang Ya Ta
Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Strapazin, No. 109. December 2012.

Yuichi Yokoyama.
Strapazin, No. 109. December 2012.

Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Yan Cong
Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Christina Gransow
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Ludmilla Bartscht
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Nine Antico

Nine Antico
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Nine Antico

Nine Antico
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

 

Airbrush Action

Since 1985 Airbrush Action has been teaching artists how to satisfy clients that go in for the Kenny Powers aesthetic. This fine magazine includes tips, tricks, step-by-step how-to’s, competitions, and interviews with airbrush artists. Seemingly every variety of airbrushed material is covered: t-shirts, cars, trucks, buses, helicopters, giant lobster statues, magazine ads, snowmobiles, pre-photoshop photo retouching, medical illustration, toy packaging graphics, fake marble walls, leotards, pleather jackets, bowling pins, bicycles, caricatures, fingernails, hair, prosthetic puppets, and fine art paintings.

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The SVA library has nearly all of the Airbrush Action magazines released between 1988 and the present. Feast your eyes.

Airbrush Action. July/August 2002.

Airbrush Action. July/August 2002.

Airbrush Action. August 1992.

Airbrush Action. August 1992.

Airbrush Action. September/October 1993.

Airbrush Action. September/October 1993.

Airbrush Action. March/April 1988.

Airbrush Action. March/April 1988.

Airbrush Action. September/October 1989.

Airbrush Action. September/October 1989.

Airbrush Action. October 1994.

Airbrush Action. October 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1989.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1989.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1988.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1988.

 

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1991.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1991.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1991.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1991.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1993.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1993.
Jozef Sumichrast

Airbrush Action. January-February 1993.
Jozef Sumichrast

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1993.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1993.
Jan Strnad & Richard Corben

Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

Jim Henson’s Creature Shop
Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

 Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

Jim Henson’s “The Dark Crystal”
Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

Jim Henson’s “Dinosaurs” Puppets
Airbrush Action. July-August 1994.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1994.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1994.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1990.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1990.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1993.

Airbrush Action. March-April 1993.

Airbrush Action

Airbrush Action.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1991.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1991.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1994.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1990.

Airbrush Action. January-February 1990.

Airbrush Action. November-December 2002.

Airbrush Action. November-December 2002.
Steve Vandemon

Airbrush Action. March-April 2005.

Airbrush Action. March-April 2005.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1993.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1993.

Airbrush Action. September-October 1994.

Airbrush Action. September-October 1994.

Airbrush Action. November-December 2002.

Airbrush Action. November-December 2002.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1993.

Airbrush Action. May-June 1993.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

Airbrush Action. July-August 1992.

 

Communication Arts, Advertising Annual 54

Spine

Your new,  beloved Communications Arts Advertising Annual has arrived in your beloved library. You will peruse this issue heavily, both because it interests you and because you’ve been instructed to do so by your instructors.  Below, enjoy the cover, the table of contents, and a sneak peak at pages 102 and 103.

We have a nearly complete run of Communication Arts starting with v. 1, n. 2 (September 1959).

Cover

table of contents 1

table of contents 2

page 102

page 103