Category Archives: Cartooning

Shonen Jump

Shonen Jump, “The World’s Most Popular Manga”, was a monthly Americanized version of the original weekly Japanese Shonen Jump. The first American Issue (no. 0) came out in November 2002. The magazine featured around 6 different comics, each by a different artist with ongoing stories that continued from one issue to the next. Featured manga titles include Naruto, Yu-Gi-Oh!, Bleach, One Piece,  Dragon Ball Z, Slam Dunk, and Yu Yu Hakusho.

Shonen Jump

Shonen Jump

The library has a total of 98 Shonen Jump‘s (all but 2) from the first to the final issue.

Remember: manga reads from right to left!

Shonen Jump, no. 0.

Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, no. 0.
Cover

Naruto by Masashi Kishimoto.

Naruto by Masashi Kishimoto.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 2. February 2003.

Yu-Gi-Oh Activity

Yu-Gi-Oh Activity
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 2. February 2003.

Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 6. June 2003.

Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 6. June 2003.
Cover

The images that follow are all from the comic YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi, which centers around teenage rebel/gang member/punk Yusuke Urameshi.

The compositions, in fight scenes especially, are extremely dynamic, with onomatopoeia sprinkled all over the place (WHAM!):

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 6. June 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 5. May 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 4. April 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 5. May 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 3. March 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

The comic is graphically playful — many different textures (halftones, gradients, speckles, marble, probably achieved through Letratone) are juxtaposed side-by-side and flatten the image.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi (close-up).
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 4. April 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 5. May 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 4. April 2003.

Togashi sometimes entirely changes his drawing style for a single panel and draws a character off-model for comedic or dramatic effect.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 5. May 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi. Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 1. January 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 1. January 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 3. March 2003.


YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 2. February 2003.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.

YuYu Hakusho by Yoshihiro Togashi.
Shonen Jump, Vol. 1, No. 5. May 2003.




Strapazin

First launched in 1984, Strapazin is a Swiss-based, German language comics magazine focused on the underground and independent scenes. The aesthetic of the work selected is often defined by expressive, gestural drawings filled with motion and  energy. Notable Strapazin contributors include SVA’s own Gary Panter and David Sandlin, as well as  Daniel Johnston, Le Dernier Cri and Julie Doucet.


spines

The SVA library has 25 issues of Strapazin from June 1994 through the current issue.

Strapazin, No. 106. March 2012.

Strapazin, No. 106. March 2012.
Cover by Sharmila Banerjee

Strapazin, No. 76.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 76.

Strapazin, No. 76.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 76.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Gary Panter
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Daniel Johnston
Strapazin, No. 95. June 2009.

Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

David Sandlin
Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

David Sandlin
Strapazin, No. 93. December 2008.

Strapazin, No. 39. June 1995.

Strapazin, No. 39. June 1995.

Strapazin, No. 103. June 2011.

Helge Reumann & Xavier Robel
Strapazin, No. 103. June 2011.

 

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Le Dernier Cri
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Le Dernier Cri
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Luca Schenardi
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

Hans Scharer

Hans Scharer
Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.

 

Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Douect
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet
Strapazin Special Issue; Bubbles, Boxes & Beyond. 2000.

 

Photo by Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

Strapazin, No. 53. December 1998.
Photo by Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

 

Strapazin, No. 107. June 2012.

Patrick Savolainen
Strapazin, No. 107. June 2012.

Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Xiang Ya Ta
Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Strapazin, No. 109. December 2012.

Yuichi Yokoyama.
Strapazin, No. 109. December 2012.

Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Yan Cong
Strapazin, No. 100. September 2010.

Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Christina Gransow
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Ludmilla Bartscht
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Nine Antico

Nine Antico
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

Nine Antico

Nine Antico
Strapazin, No. 104. September 2011.

 

National Lampoon Magazine: Relevant Irreverence

The Visual Arts Library recently acquired an (almost[1]) full run of National Lampoon Magazine. Much can be said about this magazine that originally was spun off the Harvard Lampoon. From my nerdy consumer point of view, what really draws me to this publication is their incredible enthusiasm and attention to detail. Every page of every issue (at least in their heyday: see the irreverent–there’s that word again–1970’s) is crammed with creativity, artful considerations, and in most instances, meaningful audacity. The table of contents and editorial page from the June 1974 issue:

Most of the issues are themed. This one is their “Rainy Day Sunday Funbook Issue” which apparently didn’t reached the pictured rained-in kid soon enough. One of their favorite satirical devices seems to be confusing horror with comedy; both the blood and guts and social varieties. Many of the magazines have embedded publications in them that parody other actual publications, such as this one that is supposed to have been put out by the state of Mississippi Bar Association featuring articles on “Closing Those Loopholes in Mississippi Lynch Law” and “No-Fault Rape–New Concepts to Protect Our Menfolk:”

Civil Rights and Vietnam era politics proliferate the pages, along with heaping sides of boob and toilet humor.

The list of contributing writers, illustrators, and cartoonist involved with this influential comedy magazine are chronicled in the recent publication Drunk stoned brilliant dead : the writers and artists who made the National lampoon insanely great by Rick Meyerowitz (who was closely associated with the magazine from the beginning) which will soon be available in the Visual Arts Library.


PN4900.N324 M49 2010

Here is a short brag list of artists and writers: John Hughes, Michael O’Donoghue, Neal Adams, Frank Frazetta, Russ Heath,  Bobby London, Shary Flenniken, and Edward Gorey.

Late last year the New York Public had an event in conjunction with the publication of the book: LIVE from the NYPL: AN EVENING WITH THE NATIONAL LAMPOON TO MAKE THE LIONS ROAR WITH LAUGHTER (there is an audio recording of the event if you follow the link).

And lastly, Bill Scheft ,when reviewing Meyerowitz’s book for the NY Times , credited National Lampoon Magazine for spawning ““Saturday Night Live”; “The Simpsons” and their spawn; all of late night; The Onion; and two generations who have no idea they’ve been so thoroughly influenced. ” Not bad.



[1]We are missing two issues from 1984. Also, our run ends in 1992, but only one issue was released in 1993, five in 1994, and three in 1995. For the last three years of its existence, the magazine was published only once annually until it died for good in November 1998.

NICKELODEON MAGAZINE

In December 2009 the Visual Arts Library received a generous donation from Dave Roman and Nickelodeon; a full run of Nickelodeon Magazine (1993-2008).  Dave and Chris Duffy edited the comics section of the magazine which was a prominent feature in every issue. Sometimes they would feature a vintage comic, such as this one drawn by Harvey Kurtzman in 1947:

More often, they would feature some of the most talented underground comic artists of the day, such as Sam Henderson:

and Michael Kupperman:

The list of contributing artists is long and impressive. Many of the contributors (including Dave Roman) were/are SVA alums and/or instructors. It was a great get for the library, and we are very thankful to Dave and Nickelodeon. Come to the back stacks of the periodicals, turn the crank of the compact shelving to N, take a few volumes to a comfortable seat, and enjoy.

[Below, please see a small sampling of books in our main collection by cartoonists who were featured in Nick Magazine.]

Richard Sala

PN6727.S25 C38 2009

Kaz

PN6728.U53 K45

Kim Deitch

PN6727.D383 B68 2002

Ivan Brunetti

PN6728.B779 A68 2001