Blog Archives

ADVERTISING – FOOD – 1862-1939

1862-1939 is our oldest subcategory of sustenance and taste sensation advertising. Thereafter the subdivisions are broken up by decade: 1940-1949, 1950-1959, 1960-1969, 1970-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2019.

It is astonishing how text heavy ads from this time period were. Only the legalese of drug advertisements warnings have as much text these day. Our oldest food ad (it’s actually a  book that instructs you how to better grow food) from 1888:

From the Youth’s Companion, 1898, we have a  Quaker Oats ad that pre-dates the formation of the Quaker Oats company (which formed in 1901–until that time it was called the Quaker Mill Company). We also have an ad for Beardsley’s Shredded Codfish which leverages the abstentions of lent by letting the devout know that they can still indulge in a delightful dish of fish cream and fish balls.

Also from the Youth’s Companion, 1898, is this romantic little Wheat Germ ad:

I do not have exact dates for the following four ads, but I guess they are from approximately 1900.

“This four year old girl was raised entirely on Eskay’s food.” & “For Infants and Invalids.” This is so very sinister:

I am John Mackintosh the Toffee King, and just as the moon controls the tides, I control your children:

From 1901, this may be the ugliest ad that I have ever seen:

We have many Libby’s ad from different time periods. This one, from 1904, I believe is our oldest:

I remember deviled ham sandwiches (as if I were Joe Brainard). I didn’t care for them as a child, but I could really go for one right now. 1924:

1930’s (ca):

1930 era Pep cereal depicts the boy of the house usurping the man of the house (not pictured) to the great adoration of the woman of the house.

The bread diet, 1939!

And finally, also from 1939, a comic ad for All-Bran featuring “The Regulars” sharing a page with a fencing baby.

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Magazine Covers–Pre-1920–Part 2 (Das Plakat)

Das Plakat, a German magazine, began in 1910 as an extension of Verein der Plakat Freunde (The Society for Friends of the Poster). Everything I know about Das Plakat I learned from an article by SVA’s own Steven Heller that he wrote for designtaxi.com. Read it now, and become illuminated!

We only have one proper cover of Das Plakat (Plakat means poster), a striking gold-metallic number from May 1914. The issue was devoted to European poster stamps.

The other items we have are not magazine covers, rather they are interior pages from various issues 1913-1915 (though I have decided they should live in the Magazine Covers folder so users can consider them together). Examples follow:

The next two pages feature works by Austrian painter, draftsman, illustrator, commercial graphic artist, typographer and writer Julius Klinger:

Julius Klinger in our book stacks:

Database: Visual Arts Library
Location: Main Stacks
Call Number: NK1550 .K5513 1985
Number of Items: 1
Status: Available
There are

Next is a poster advertising a Schützenfest (target shooting party) by Richard Schaupp:

And lastly the title page from the January 05, 1914 edition:

Magazine Covers – Pre-1920 – Part 1 (Magazines for girls, boys, and women)

So, magazine covers. I will try to do at least 1 post for each chronological subdivision, starting with pre-1920.

First, our oldest magazine cover, a very Victorian Scribner’s Illustrated Magazine, June 1874.

I must admit that I love the S's in "For Girls and Boys" though they do nothing to indicate playfulness or carefree childhood. Maybe it is for "naughty" girls and boys.

Next up, a patriotic Pearson’s from July 1900 featuring a very red, white, blue and  well-armed youth.

And how about this lot to accompany our youth; The Youth’s Companion, Thanksgiving Number for 1905.

Onward...

Jumping ahead 7 years with the same title, we have a softer, better rouged youth’s companion.

“The starlight’s cheery gleam, the moonlight’s calm,” a B&W, angelic companion for a woman, January 1901.

I am not sure what this January 1905 edition of Good Housekeeping is depicting, a housewife stealing away into the night on ice skates, clutching her pillow?

That’s bizarre, there’s only one ‘a’ in Bazar: