Blog Archives

American Illustrated Magazine

amill spines

American Illustrated Magazine
November 1905-October 1906 (Volumes 61-62)

American Illustrated Magazine does not explain itself. It gets right on with the story. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, on soft, aromatic paper. Pleasantly antiquated. And illustrated of course, with photographs, like a series of bird portraits or a crocodile hunt, or with drawings that step out in front of what they were meant to describe. As if they told their own story all along.

 

ill1

Walter Glackens, April 1906

 

ill9

Arthur G. Dove, Feb. 1906

 

ill18

F.R. Gruger, Nov. 1905

 

ill19

Arthur G. Dove, Nov. 1905

 

ill10

Henry S. Watson, Jan. 1906

 

ill5

Franklin Booth, March 1906

 

ill11

H.E. Townsend, Jan. 1906

 

ill2

George Kerr, April 1906

 

ill12

H.E. Townsend, Jan. 1906

 

ill3

Philip R. Goodwin, April 1906

 

ill4

Philip R. Goodwin, April 1906

 

ill13

Karl Anderson, Jan. 1906

 

ill14

C.D. Williams, Dec. 1905

 

ill15

Rose Cecil O’Neill, Dec. 1905

 

ill16

Henry Heyer, Nov. 1905

 

ill20

Arthur G. Dove, Nov. 1905

 

ill7

Lynn Bogue Hunt, Feb. 1906

 

ill6

J.M. Conde, Feb. 1906

 

ill17

F.R. Gruger, Nov. 1905

 

ill8

Charles Sarka, Feb. 1906

Advertisements

ADVERTISING – FOOD – 1862-1939

1862-1939 is our oldest subcategory of sustenance and taste sensation advertising. Thereafter the subdivisions are broken up by decade: 1940-1949, 1950-1959, 1960-1969, 1970-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2019.

It is astonishing how text heavy ads from this time period were. Only the legalese of drug advertisements warnings have as much text these day. Our oldest food ad (it’s actually a  book that instructs you how to better grow food) from 1888:

From the Youth’s Companion, 1898, we have a  Quaker Oats ad that pre-dates the formation of the Quaker Oats company (which formed in 1901–until that time it was called the Quaker Mill Company). We also have an ad for Beardsley’s Shredded Codfish which leverages the abstentions of lent by letting the devout know that they can still indulge in a delightful dish of fish cream and fish balls.

Also from the Youth’s Companion, 1898, is this romantic little Wheat Germ ad:

I do not have exact dates for the following four ads, but I guess they are from approximately 1900.

“This four year old girl was raised entirely on Eskay’s food.” & “For Infants and Invalids.” This is so very sinister:

I am John Mackintosh the Toffee King, and just as the moon controls the tides, I control your children:

From 1901, this may be the ugliest ad that I have ever seen:

We have many Libby’s ad from different time periods. This one, from 1904, I believe is our oldest:

I remember deviled ham sandwiches (as if I were Joe Brainard). I didn’t care for them as a child, but I could really go for one right now. 1924:

1930’s (ca):

1930 era Pep cereal depicts the boy of the house usurping the man of the house (not pictured) to the great adoration of the woman of the house.

The bread diet, 1939!

And finally, also from 1939, a comic ad for All-Bran featuring “The Regulars” sharing a page with a fencing baby.

Magazine Covers – Pre-1920 – Part 1 (Magazines for girls, boys, and women)

So, magazine covers. I will try to do at least 1 post for each chronological subdivision, starting with pre-1920.

First, our oldest magazine cover, a very Victorian Scribner’s Illustrated Magazine, June 1874.

I must admit that I love the S's in "For Girls and Boys" though they do nothing to indicate playfulness or carefree childhood. Maybe it is for "naughty" girls and boys.

Next up, a patriotic Pearson’s from July 1900 featuring a very red, white, blue and  well-armed youth.

And how about this lot to accompany our youth; The Youth’s Companion, Thanksgiving Number for 1905.

Onward...

Jumping ahead 7 years with the same title, we have a softer, better rouged youth’s companion.

“The starlight’s cheery gleam, the moonlight’s calm,” a B&W, angelic companion for a woman, January 1901.

I am not sure what this January 1905 edition of Good Housekeeping is depicting, a housewife stealing away into the night on ice skates, clutching her pillow?

That’s bizarre, there’s only one ‘a’ in Bazar: