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Cinefantastique

From the official Cinefantastique website:

“During a decade when many mainstream critics were dismissing THE EXORICST as sadistic pornography, and when Forest J Ackerman was filling Famous Monsters with puny puns (e.g., “A Clockwork Lemon,” referring to a malfunctioning robot in FUTURE WORLD), publisher-editor Frederick S. Clarke created a little magazine with a big ambition: to cover the genre better than anybody, and to do it with all the seriousness of Cashier du Cinema, American Film, or Film Comment.”

spineFor anyone fascinated by sci-fi, fantasty, or horror films riding on big dreams and a tiny budget, Cinefantastique is a goldmine. The writers do not simply dismiss their subjects as many critics are apt to do with genre films, nor do they shower their subjects with praise as in a fanzine. Cinefantastique was composed with both the genuine passion of a devoted fan and the thoughtful insight of a critic, resulting in an engaging editorial. Interviews, critiques, and in-depth explorations of special effects and prosthesis are complimented by film stills and behind-the-scenes shots on every page. There are also fantastic full-color spreads throughout, framed by well-designed layouts and text. Feature articles are prodigiously in-depth and as such have left behind invaluable sources for research and admiration relating to dozens of seminal genre films.  There are very few advertisements and most are beautifully painted film posters regardless, making the magazine all the more enjoyable to read.

In 2000, Frederick Clarke, publisher since 1970, committed suicide. Mindfire Entertainment bought the magazine, renamed it “CFQ” and entirely remodeled its approach and aesthetic in an attempt to meet the demands of today’s consumer. In 2006 the last issue of CFQ was printed, and has been exclusively published online ever since.

In the periodicals section you will find 15 volumes of  Cinefantastique beginning with the 4th volume, published in 1975, up until the final 2006 issue.

Cinefantastique, Volume 20, Number 05. May 1990.
She-Creature by Jackie and Paul Blaisdell

Cinefantastique, Volume 20, Number 05. May 1990.
Blaisdell’s Venusian

Cinefantastique, Volume 20, Number 05. May 1990.

Cinefantastique, Volume 6, Number 01. 1977.
Brian DePalma’s “Carrie”.

Cinefantastqieu, Volume 6, Number 02. 1977.
Stills from stop-motion films by Ray Harry Hausen.

Cinefantastique, Volume 07, Number 03. 1978.

Cinefantastique, Volume 07, Number 03. 1978.
Tom Burman’s Aliens.

Cinefantastique, Volume 08, Number 01. 1978.

Cinefantastique, Volume 09, Number 02. 1979.

Cinefantastique, Volume 10, Number 04. 1979.
Animation in “Superman” and “Xanadu”

Cinefantastique, Volume 11, Number 01. 1981.

Cinefantastique, Volume 11, Number 02. 1981.

Cinefantastique, Volume 11, Number 02. 1981.
“Altered States”

Cinefantastique, Volume 13, Number 01. 1982.
“Creepshow”

Cinefantastique, Volume 13, Number 01. 1982.
Left: Madeline Kahn. Right: Jerry Lee Lewis.

Cinefantastique, Volume 17, Number 01. 1987.
“Necropolis”

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African Arts

spineFrom the UCLA African Arts homepage:

African Arts presents original research and critical discourse on traditional, contemporary, and popular African arts and expressive cultures. Since 1967, the journal has reflected the dynamism and diversity of several fields of humanistic study, publishing richly illustrated articles in full color, incorporating the most current theory, practice, and intercultural dialogue.”

Utilizing raw materials like straw and palm fronds, the artists represented here display an uninhibited mastery of caricature. They distort the literal human image with a sense of humor and playfulness into an iconic and sometimes frightening archetype.

Our current holdings of African Arts begin in 1976. Here are some selections from the earlier issues:

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 02. January 1978.  "The Dan Masker zakpai ga from Gpapolulo. Its main function is to insure that women have put out their fires every noon during the dry season before the potentially dangerous afternoon winds begin to blow." Photo by Eberhard and Barbara Fischer.

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 02. January 1978.
“The Dan Masker zakpai ga from Gpapolulo. Its main function is to insure that women have put out their fires every noon during the dry season before the potentially dangerous afternoon winds begin to blow.”
Photo by Eberhard and Barbara Fischer.

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 02. January 1978. Traditional Ndebele Beadwork. Left: "A woman wearing her mapoto stands before the brightly colored murals of her house." Right: "An elderly woman wearing a Linaga decorated with a broad strip of small white beads. It has designs in the traditional red-blue-green-orange color combination." Photos by Suzanne Priebatsch & Natalie Knight.

jan1978volxi#2African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 02. January 1978.
Traditional Ndebele Beadwork.
Top Left: “A woman wearing her mapoto stands before the brightly colored murals of her house.”
Top Right: “An elderly woman wearing a Linaga decorated with a broad strip of small white beads. It has designs in the traditional red-blue-green-orange color combination.”
Bottom Right: “A maiden poses with her mother’s magnificently beaded blanket. The predominance of blue, green and black beads indicates its recent vintage.”
Photos by Suzanne Priebatsch & Natalie Knight.

African Arts, Volume X, Issue Number 02. January 1977. "Birthday for African Arts and the united States Bicentennial." Tito Zungu, South Africa. Ballpoint pen and koki pen on paper. 20 cm x 25 cm.

African Arts, Volume X, Issue Number 02. January 1977.
“Birthday for African Arts and the united States Bicentennial.” Tito Zungu, South Africa. Ballpoint pen and koki pen on paper. 20 cm x 25 cm.

African Arts, Volume X, Issue Number 02. January 1977. Right: "Flower composition between door and window painted to represent formalized leaves. Xhosa, near Assegai Bush, Cape Province." Left: "Litema motif. Sotho, near Kroonstad, orange free state.

African Arts, Volume X, Issue Number 02. January 1977.
Right: “Flower composition between door and window painted to represent formalized leaves. Xhosa, near Assegai Bush, Cape Province.”
Left: “Litema motif. Sotho, near Kroonstad, orange free state.”

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 03. April 1978. "The idean lyawo, described by some as reprseenting a bride or wife, who exudes quiet dignity and refinement in her dance and costume. Her body is enveloped in folds of costly fabric, and her elaborate hairstyle is bedecked with silver and gold. Iyawo's facial features are rendered in appliqued red cloth bisected by shiny zippers." IIaro, Nigeria. Photo: Henry John Drewal.

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 03. April 1978.
“The idean lyawo, described by some as reprseenting a bride or wife, who exudes quiet dignity and refinement in her dance and costume. Her body is enveloped in folds of costly fabric, and her elaborate hairstyle is bedecked with silver and gold. Iyawo’s facial features are rendered in appliqued red cloth bisected by shiny zippers.”
IIaro, Nigeria.
Photo: Henry John Drewal.

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 03. April 1978.

African Arts, Volume XI, Issue Number 03. April 1978.
Egungun (masked figures)
Ikenne, Nigeria.
Photos: Klindt Houlberg.

African Arts, Volume XX, Issue Number 01. October 1986.

African Arts, Volume XX, Issue Number 01. October 1986.
Right: Masquerades at the Ebi-Woro Festival. Ijebu, 1982.
Photos: Henry John Drewal.

African Arts, Volume XX, Issue Number 01. October 1986.

African Arts, Volume XX, Issue Number 01. October 1986.
Right: Jigbo Masqueraders. Ijebu, 1982.
Photos: Henry John Drewal.

African Arts, Volume XXI, Issue Number 02. February 1988. In the Mami Wata Shrine of Dr. Alphonsus Njoku. Photos: Margaret and Henry Drewal.

African Arts, Volume XXI, Issue Number 02. February 1988.
In the Mami Wata Shrine of Dr. Alphonsus Njoku.
Photos: Margaret and Henry Drewal.