Album

spines

Album

February 1970-January 1971
(12 issues; missing #4 & #8)

Album was published in London from 1970 to 1971. Its editor was Bill Jay.

It was a magazine of photography’s incursions.

Every page is black and white. No ornament, austere blocks of text. The effect is like drawing a curtain, or dimming the lights in a theater, only without the direction dictated by film, leaving you free to wander.

There are no advertisements.

Its concern was the actuality of practice. Old essays followed new talents in a critical space where “art photography” was as ludicrous a term as “art painting,” and what appears easy and available as a technology is, like any artistic practice, much more fugitive and essential.

 

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Duane Michals, Issue #7

 

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Issue #1

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from “On Being a Radical Photographer,” an interview with Blankfort, Issue #1

 

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W. Eugene Smith, “Black Man’s Battleground,” Issue #2

 

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from Issue #2

 

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W. Eugene Smith, “Mailbox,” Ku Klux Klan series, Issue #2

 

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from Press Cuttings, Issue #2

 

 

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from Quotes, Issue #1

 

 

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Gordon Bennett, “San Francisco,” Issue #11

 

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from Opinions, Issue #1

 

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Bill Brandt, “Friar’s Bay,” Issue #1

 

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from Opinions, Issue #7

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Manuel Alvarez Bravo, “Luz restrida,” Issue #9

 

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from John Thomson’s “Illustrations of China and its People,” Issue #9

 

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George N. Barnard, official photographer to Sherman’s Campaign, Issue #7

 

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Harvey Himelfarb, from the Visual Dialogue Foundation portfolio, “Premonitions of a Tyranny of Culture,” Issue #10

They dressed me up like this

We’ve been on a witch hunt. Look what we found.

Our witches are real. We stake our lives on it.

‘Tis the season for torture and fear. Just kidding. It’s time for costumes and pumpkins and beer. Prost.

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^2

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witch3

^3

witch4

^1

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^1

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^3

witch7

^3

witch8

^3

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^3

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^3

witch11

^3

witch12

^1

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^3

 

In the Picture Collection under Mythology & Fairy Tale –> Witches & Wizards.

 

Sources:
1. Jong, Erica, “Witches,” Abradale Press, 1981
2. Ingpen, Robert and Page, Michael, “Encyclopedia of Things That Never Were,” Viking, 1987
3. Maple, Eric, “Witchcraft,” Octopus, 1973

Mannequins

Dress forms have been around for ages, with possibly the oldest one discovered in 1923 in King Tutankhamun’s tomb dating back to approximately 1350 B.C! What started as a basic and utilitarian human-like frame morphed through the ages from simple busts to elaborate European fashion dolls to the mannequins we see casually hanging out at store windows today. Not very casually actually, since they might actually be sizing you up for the powers that be.

Not surprisingly, these adjustable, modifiable  human stand-ins also ended up in many works of art. And more recently, like this unwed lady who responded to the pressures of having a family by simply going out and buying herself the perfect one. And then spending 14 years documenting their life together.

Or this mannequin-dancer-robot-monster. Wow, that eye contact.

Jordan Wolfson’s piece at David Zwirner Gallery

 

As you go through the folder, you can see window displays and how mannequins changed shape over the years, including some old and abandoned ones from a mannequin factory. You will also find pictures of their modern utilitarian versions – crash test dummies.

One of the highlights of this folder is a 7-page vintage 1920s catalog for a French mannequin maker. Each Flapper era mannequin is shown here in beautifully lit, black and white images.

Including the ones below, the Mannequins folder has a total of 38 items.

 

 

 

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Cover for the The “Succes” Collection catalog by Mannequins Siegel Bruxelles

 

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Right : Model No. 51001 – Imitation Wax

 

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Middle : Google says it means “Remember that we submit a model at home”. Left : Model No. 51005 – Resistant to all temperatures Right : Model No. 51004 – Washable and easy to maintain

 

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Left : Model No. 51002 – Make up does not alter in light. Right : Model No. 51003 – Google thinks it means “Resistant composition and unlimited duration”

 

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Petrole Hahn, 1931 – Gelatin Silver Print – Photo by Ellen Auerbach and Grete Stern

 

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Avenue de Gobelins, 1925 Gold-toned albumen print – Photo by Eugene Atget

 

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Early window displays

 

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Oh my, look how costly the US woman has to be.

 

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Stare, Detroit Mannequin Factory – 1999

 

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Top : Four Faces, Detroit Mannequin Factory – 1999. Bottom : Baby Faces And Hands, Detroit Mannequin Factory -1999

 

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From “Modern Maturity” magazine – April/May 1978

 

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Window display 1

 

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Window display 2

 

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Window display 3

 

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“I prefer my pants just so” window display 4

 

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Window display 5

 

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Soviet Life

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Soviet Life
May 1968-May 1981 (incomplete)

In 1956 the U.S. and Soviet governments agreed to a mutual propaganda plan modeled on Life. From them we got The USSR which became Soviet Life which became Russian Life. From us they got Amerika which became America Illustrated. “Soft” propaganda for a Cold War. Gentle cultural competition. Achievement, progress, beauty, tourism. Soviet Life could celebrate the cosmonauts and the construction of a dam as though ballistics and explosives were signs of society’s liberation. One can just imagine what Amerika looked like.

Somewhat relatedly, the U.S. Information Agency, which seems to have had a hand in all this, also employed Chermayeff & Geismar (which later added & Haviv) for a traveling Russian-language exhibition that showcased American design. Featured among the designer portraits, which can be found in the Milton Glaser Archives, was none other than Milton Glaser.

Find Soviet Life bound in green in the back near the bathrooms.

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cosmos

Intercosmos: Orbits of Cooperation, April 1981

cosmo wives

Perhaps the Hardest Part is Waiting, April 1981

umbrella

Kutaisi, This Wonderful Town, May 1981

fest

The Festival for Everybody, May 1981

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Marx and Lincoln, May 1968

women

Women Take Over Men’s Jobs, May 1981

kiev

What is Kreshchatik to the Man on the Street?, July 1968

blast

Blast Saves a City, June 1968

Nest : a magazine of interiors

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Nest
Fall 1998-Fall 2004

In the Winter 1999-2000 issue of Nest, architect and urban theorist Rem Koolhaas wrote in critical appreciation:

Nest goes for the jugular of the secretive. Sometimes the intimacies revealed are almost voyeuristically painful. It is significant that in the era of celebrity and the relentless confessional, the glimpses of previously hidden lives that Nest reveals are shocking in their acute, slightly obscene quality. They show the extent of editing, pruning and laundering that the professional press of revelation performs before launching its “surprises” for the public. By insisting on the intricacies of private life Nest reveals the complete flattening of the public at the end of the 20th century.”

Founding editor Joseph Holtzman “believed that an igloo, a prison cell or a child’s attic room (adorned with Farrah Fawcett posters) could be as compelling as a room by a famous designer” (NYT). His relentless magazine ran for 26 issues. The SVA Library has all but the first issues (donations encouraged).

These scans don’t do its vibrancy justice.

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Igloos, Fall 1998

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“This building is my memory,” Fall 1998

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A Room of One’s Own, Fall 1998

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Philip Apagya’s Portrait Studio, Winter 1999-2000

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Final Nest: Death Chambers, Winter 2001-2002

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Les Harris, Winter 2001-2002

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Object Lesson, Summer 2000 (inside the home of Warhol’s longtime manager Fred Hughes, whose bedridden baldspot is featured in the foreground)

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Palace of Living Art, Summer 2000 (Van Gogh in wax)

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Divine Providence, Spring 2004 (“recent design trends at Rhode Island School of Design”)

And if beautifully published periodicals on realistic interior design (i.e. not Architectural Digest–which we also have) is your thing, have a look at Spain based Apartemento .

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