Holidays – Christmas – Cards

Please enjoy these precious little Christmas cards from the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s. More can be found in  Holidays – Christmas – Cards. Happy Holidays!

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Design from 1961

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Design from 1976

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Design from 1973

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Design from 1966

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Relief design from 1972

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Designs from 1958

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Illustration by Hobson Pittman & Madye Lee Chastian

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Top left , “Skating in The Park” by BOSA; below, “Frozen Up” by Currier & Ives

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Happy Holidays!

Wig Wag

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Wig Wag
Summer 1988 – December 1989; June 1990 – February 1991

In an archive almost everything carries the aroma of obituary. A book’s cover resembles a mausoleum door, newspapers evoke autumn leaves, a magazine’s tint becomes a mortician’s makeup. Bylines are empty chairs. In our digital realm, which seems so lively, everything passes before we’ve finished, is made to fade into the next, which is why it all gets saved.

Wig Wag is not online. The magazine lived for three years between the minor New Yorker exodus that staffed it and the first Iraq war’s recession that killed it. Founding editor Alexander Kaplen aimed gently at “A Picture of American Life,” a little literary and not too heartlandish. Wig Wag‘s “Letters From Home” could be set against The New Yorker‘s “Talk of the Town.” Terry McMillan, William Maxwell, Peter Matthiessen, Norman Rush, Sven Birkerts, Sousa Jamba, Luc Sante you’ve maybe heard of; many more you certainly haven’t. But the effort to turn from city-centrism seems more significant for its failure.

A notable tool in Wig Wag‘s kit was their “Indignites: Our monthly listing of who’s beating up on whom.” Critical briefs that don’t always read as anachronistic as we might like.

Wig wag, it was pointed out to us by poet and SVA professor Ray DiPalma, is that thing you do with flags on a runway when you’re trying to keep airplanes from crashing.

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February 1991

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December 1990

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November 1990

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November 1990

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October 1990

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October 1990

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June 1990

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November 1989

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September 1990

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August 1990

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December 1989

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Summer 1988

American Illustrated Magazine

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American Illustrated Magazine
November 1905-October 1906 (Volumes 61-62)

American Illustrated Magazine does not explain itself. It gets right on with the story. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, on soft, aromatic paper. Pleasantly antiquated. And illustrated of course, with photographs, like a series of bird portraits or a crocodile hunt, or with drawings that step out in front of what they were meant to describe. As if they told their own story all along.

 

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Walter Glackens, April 1906

 

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Arthur G. Dove, Feb. 1906

 

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F.R. Gruger, Nov. 1905

 

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Arthur G. Dove, Nov. 1905

 

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Henry S. Watson, Jan. 1906

 

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Franklin Booth, March 1906

 

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H.E. Townsend, Jan. 1906

 

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George Kerr, April 1906

 

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H.E. Townsend, Jan. 1906

 

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Philip R. Goodwin, April 1906

 

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Philip R. Goodwin, April 1906

 

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Karl Anderson, Jan. 1906

 

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C.D. Williams, Dec. 1905

 

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Rose Cecil O’Neill, Dec. 1905

 

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Henry Heyer, Nov. 1905

 

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Arthur G. Dove, Nov. 1905

 

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Lynn Bogue Hunt, Feb. 1906

 

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J.M. Conde, Feb. 1906

 

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F.R. Gruger, Nov. 1905

 

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Charles Sarka, Feb. 1906

Advertising – Paper & Printing

For the nostalgic paper chaser. Advertising – Paper & Printing. You have to feel it to believe it.

Also check out the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company’s contributions to our collection. More “Inspiration for Printers.”

 

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Fedrigoni

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Life, June 13, 1955

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Communication Arts, Vol. 13 No. 1 (illustration by Seymour Chwast) 

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Fortune, Oct. 1951

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Fortune, Aug. 1951

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Print, XXXVIII: VI

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Mohawk Paper Mills

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Communication Arts, Vol. 13 No. 1

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Fortune, Aug. 1951

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Kolor Skemes

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Fortune, Jan. 1949

Occupations

What color is your collar? Do you even have a shirt on your back? What does work really mean? Is it ever any good?

Our Occupations picture folders – divided by Blue or White, Collar of course – may not answer these or any other questions, but they’re worth a look.

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